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ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2014 Jul 23;6(14):11385-93. doi: 10.1021/am501961b. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

Building an antifouling zwitterionic coating on urinary catheters using an enzymatically triggered bottom-up approach.

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1
Grup de Biotecnologia Molecular i Industrial, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Polit├Ęcnica de Catalunya , Rambla Sant Nebridi 22, 08222 Terrassa, Spain.

Abstract

Catheter associated urinary tract infections are common during hospitalization due to the formation of bacterial biofilms on the indwelling device. In this study, we report an innovative biotechnology-based approach for the covalent functionalization of silicone catheters with antifouling zwitterionic moieties to prevent biofilm formation. Our approach combines the potential bioactivity of a natural phenolics layer biocatalytically conjugated to sulfobetaine-acrylic residues in an enzymatically initiated surface radical polymerization with laccase. To ensure sufficient coating stability in urine, the silicone catheter is plasma-activated. In contrast to industrial chemical methods, the methacrylate-containing zwitterionic monomers are polymerized at pH 5 and 50 ┬░C using as an initiator the phenoxy radicals solely generated by laccase on the phenolics-coated catheter surface. The coated catheters are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and colorimetrically. Contact angle and protein adsorption measurements, coupled with in vitro tests with the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus in static and dynamic conditions, mimicking the operational conditions to be faced by the catheters, demonstrate reduced biofilm formation by about 80% when compared to that of unmodified urinary catheters. The zwitterionic coating did not affect the viability of the human fibroblasts (BJ-5ta) over seven days, corresponding to the extended useful life of urinary catheters.

PMID:
24955478
DOI:
10.1021/am501961b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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