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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2014 Oct;20(10):1592-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.06.014. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

Parametric response mapping as an indicator of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: cgalban@med.umich.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
4
Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
5
Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
7
Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
8
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
9
Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
10
Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

The management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after hematopoietic cell transplantation presents many challenges, both diagnostically and therapeutically. We developed a computed tomography (CT) voxel-wise methodology termed parametric response mapping (PRM) that quantifies normal parenchyma, functional small airway disease (PRM(fSAD)), emphysema, and parenchymal disease as relative lung volumes. We now investigate the use of PRM as an imaging biomarker in the diagnosis of BOS. PRM was applied to CT data from 4 patient cohorts: acute infection (n = 11), BOS at onset (n = 34), BOS plus infection (n = 9), and age-matched, nontransplant control subjects (n = 23). Pulmonary function tests and bronchoalveolar lavage were used for group classification. Mean values for PRM(fSAD) were significantly greater in patients with BOS (38% ± 2%) when compared with those with infection alone (17% ± 4%, P < .0001) and age-matched control subjects (8.4% ± 1%, P < .0001). Patients with BOS had similar PRM(fSAD) profiles, whether a concurrent infection was present or not. An optimal cut-point for PRM(fSAD) of 28% of the total lung volume was identified, with values >28% highly indicative of BOS occurrence. PRM may provide a major advance in our ability to identify the small airway obstruction that characterizes BOS, even in the presence of concurrent infection.

KEYWORDS:

Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome; Pulmonary; Transplantation

PMID:
24954547
PMCID:
PMC4163140
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.06.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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