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Environ Int. 2014 Oct;71:29-35. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2014.06.002. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Access to urban green spaces and behavioural problems in children: Results from the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

Author information

1
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; Division of Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine, Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
2
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometrics and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
3
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
4
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
5
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
6
Research Institute, Department of Paediatrics, Marien-Hospital Wesel, Wesel, Germany.
7
Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
8
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. Electronic address: heinrich@helmholtz-muenchen.de.

Erratum in

  • Environ Int. 2015 Sep;82:115.

Abstract

AIM:

We investigated whether objectively measured access to urban green spaces is associated with behavioural problems in 10-year old children living in Munich and its surrounding areas.

METHODS:

Behavioural problems were assessed in the GINIplus and LISAplus 10-year follow-up between 2006 and 2009 using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Access to green spaces was defined using the distance from a child's residence to the nearest urban green space. Associations between access to urban green spaces and behavioural problems were assessed using proportional odds and logistic regression models in 1932 children with complete exposure, outcome and covariate data.

RESULTS:

The distance between a child's residence and the nearest urban green space was positively associated with the odds of hyperactivity/inattention, especially among children with abnormal values compared to children with borderline or normal values (odds ratio (OR)=1.20 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.01-1.42) per 500 m increase in distance). When stratified by sex, this association was only statistically significant among males. Children living further than 500 m away from urban green spaces had more overall behavioural problems than those living within 500 m of urban green spaces (proportional OR=1.41 (95% CI=1.06-1.87)). Behavioural problems were not associated with the distance to forests or with residential surrounding greenness.

CONCLUSION:

Poor access to urban green spaces was associated with behavioural problems in 10-year old children. Results were most consistent with hyperactivity/inattention problems.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioural problems; Child health; Green space; Greenness; Mental health; Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

PMID:
24953038
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2014.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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