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Epilepsy Behav. 2014 Aug;37:20-5. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.05.022. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Executive function and sleep problems in childhood epilepsy.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
2
Southampton Children's Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, UK.
3
Division of Clinical Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; Southampton Children's Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, UK; Neurosciences Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guildford Street, London, UK.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK.
5
Department of Child Health, Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Hampshire Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Winchester, UK.
6
Division of Clinical Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; Southampton Children's Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, UK. Electronic address: cmh2@southampton.ac.uk.

Abstract

Pediatric epilepsy has been reported to be associated with both sleep problems and cognitive deficits. In turn, in healthy children, poorer sleep has been associated with deficits in cognitive functioning. We hypothesized that poor sleep in childhood epilepsy may contribute to cognitive deficits. Using actigraphy, we objectively measured the sleep of children with epilepsy alongside that of healthy controls. In contrast to previous reports, we did not find any differences in objectively measured sleep between children with epilepsy and healthy controls. However, significant deficits in cognitive functioning were demonstrated that were not explained by differences in sleep.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Cognition; Epilepsy; Sleep

PMID:
24952234
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.05.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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