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Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2014 Sep;44(9):783-91. doi: 10.1093/jjco/hyu082. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Body mass index and risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun.
2
School of Mathematics and Statistics, Northeast Normal University, Changchun.
3
Key Laboratory of Radiobiology (Ministry of Health), School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
4
Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun liuxin19890322@163.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Overweight and obesity, indicated as increased body mass index, are associated with the risk of some cancers. We carried out a meta-analysis on published cohort and case-control studies to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer.

METHODS:

Relevant studies were identified through PubMed, Web of Science and Medline electronic databases. Adjusted relative risks (odds ratios) with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer.

RESULTS:

Sixteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer (odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.24) compared with normal weight (body mass index = 18.5 to <25 kg/m(2)), while overweight (body mass index = 18.5 to <30 kg/m(2)) showed no association (odds ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval = 0.96-1.12). Specifically, a stratified analysis showed there were associations between obesity and the increased risk of gastric cancer for males (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.48), non-Asians (odds ratio = 1.14, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.28) and both cohort studies (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.22) and case-control studies (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.60). Both overweight (odds ratio = 1.22, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.42) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.15-2.24) were associated with the increased risk of gastric cardia cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicated that obesity was associated with the risk of gastric cancer, especially for males and among non-Asians. Both overweight and obesity were associated with the risk of gastric cardia cancer.

KEYWORDS:

body mass index; gastric cancer; meta-analysis; obesity; risk

PMID:
24951830
DOI:
10.1093/jjco/hyu082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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