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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Sep;80(17):5292-303. doi: 10.1128/AEM.01643-14. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

The functional structure of central carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, TU Dortmund University, Dortmund, Germany Institute of Biochemical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany.
2
Clinical Research Group, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
3
Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, TU Dortmund University, Dortmund, Germany.
4
Institute of Biochemical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany.
5
Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, TU Dortmund University, Dortmund, Germany andreas.schmid@bci.tu-dortmund.de.

Abstract

What defines central carbon metabolism? The classic textbook scheme of central metabolism includes the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway of glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle. The prevalence of this definition of central metabolism is, however, equivocal without experimental validation. We address this issue using a general experimental approach that combines the monitoring of transcriptional and metabolic flux changes between steady states on alternative carbon sources. This approach is investigated by using the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida with glucose, fructose, and benzoate as carbon sources. The catabolic reactions involved in the initial uptake and metabolism of these substrates are expected to show a correlated change in gene expressions and metabolic fluxes. However, there was no correlation for the reactions linking the 12 biomass precursor molecules, indicating a regulation mechanism other than mRNA synthesis for central metabolism. This result substantiates evidence for a (re)definition of central carbon metabolism including all reactions that are bound to tight regulation and transcriptional invariance. Contrary to expectations, the canonical Entner-Doudoroff and EMP pathways sensu stricto are not a part of central carbon metabolism in P. putida, as they are not regulated differently from the aromatic degradation pathway. The regulatory analyses presented here provide leads on a qualitative basis to address the use of alternative carbon sources by deregulation and overexpression at the transcriptional level, while rate improvements in central carbon metabolism require careful adjustment of metabolite concentrations, as regulation resides to a large extent in posttranslational and/or metabolic regulation.

PMID:
24951791
PMCID:
PMC4136102
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.01643-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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