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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2014 Jul;113(1):69-74.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2014.04.016.

What affects quality of life among caregivers of food-allergic children?

Author information

1
The University of Michigan Food Allergy Center, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
2
The University of Michigan Food Allergy Center, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Family Allergy & Asthma, Florence, Kentucky.
3
The University of Michigan Food Allergy Center, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: mgreenha@med.umich.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Food allergy is associated with decreased caregiver quality of life (QoL). The influence of accurate reaction perception, allergen, and sociodemographic factors on caregiver QoL is poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine factors influencing caregiver food allergy QoL within an academic center cohort.

METHODS:

Caregivers of children allergic to milk, egg, peanut, or tree nut evaluated from 2009 to 2011 completed a questionnaire assessing the details of the children's most severe food reaction and caregiver QoL using the Food Allergy Quality of Life-Parental Burden index. Survey responses were verified through chart review. A multiple linear regression model was used to determine factors influencing QoL score.

RESULTS:

Of 305 caregivers surveyed, 65% had accurate reaction perception. This was higher in caregivers of children with provider-confirmed anaphylaxis (P = .008). Milk or egg allergy was associated with higher total and independent domain-specific QoL scores compared with peanut or tree nut allergy, and an income lower than $50,000 was associated with higher total QoL scores and higher scores for 5 of 17 individual domains. In a linear regression model, age at most severe reaction (-0.02, P = .01), peanut or tree nut allergy (-0.81, P = .004) and milk allergy (-1.12, P = .001) vs egg allergy, income higher than $50,000 (-0.53, P = .04), multiple food allergies (0.45, P = .007), accurate reaction perception (-0.37, P = .04), eczema (+0.49, P = .004), and caregiver report that the child had anaphylaxis (+0.48, P = .02) were significantly associated with QoL score.

CONCLUSION:

Food allergen, having multiple food allergies, age at reaction, income, eczema, parent-reported anaphylaxis, and reaction perception can significantly affect caregiver food allergy QoL. Milk or egg allergy was associated with worse total and domain-specific caregiver QoL scores vs peanut or tree nut allergy, representing a high-risk subgroup.

PMID:
24950845
DOI:
10.1016/j.anai.2014.04.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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