Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2014 Jun 20;9(6):e100181. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100181. eCollection 2014.

Socioeconomic status and trajectory of overweight from birth to mid-childhood: the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort.

Author information

1
Department of International Health (Human Nutrition), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States of America.
2
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States of America; School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States of America.
3
Department of Family and Community Medicine and Center for Health and Community, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
4
University of California Berkeley University of California San Francisco Joint Medical Program (JMP), Berkeley, California, United States of America.
5
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to use longitudinal data from a US birth cohort to test whether the probability of overweight or obesity during the first 6 years of life varied according to socioeconomic status.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Using six waves of longitudinal data from full-term children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007; n≈4,950), we examined the prevalence of overweight or obesity (Body Mass Index (BMI)>2 standard deviations above age- and sex- specific WHO Childhood Growth Standard reference mean; henceforth, "overweight/obesity") according to age, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity using generalized estimating equation models.

RESULTS:

The association between socioeconomic status and overweight/obesity varied significantly by race/ethnicity, but not by sex. Overweight/obesity was significantly associated with socioeconomic status among whites, Hispanics and Asians; the adjusted odds of overweight/obesity began to diverge according to SES after the first 9 months of life. By approximately 4 years, children with the highest SES had a significantly lower odds of overweight/obesity. SES was not significantly related to overweight/obesity among African Americans and American Indians during early childhood.

CONCLUSIONS:

Few studies have assessed the associations between SES and overweight/obesity within racial/ethnic groups in the US. We find that in contemporary, US-born children, SES was inversely associated with overweight/obesity among more racial/ethnic groups (whites, Hispanics, and Asians) than previously reported.

PMID:
24950056
PMCID:
PMC4065031
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0100181
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center