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Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Oct;35(10):2299-315. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.05.027. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

Physical fitness is predictive for a decline in daily functioning in older adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the HA-ID study.

Author information

1
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Ipse de Bruggen, P.O. Box 7027, 2701 AA Zoetermeer, the Netherlands. Electronic address: a.oppewal@erasmusmc.nl.
2
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Abrona, Amersfoortseweg 56, 3712 BE Huis ter Heide, the Netherlands.
3
Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, the Netherlands.
4
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Abstract

A high incidence of limitations in daily functioning is seen in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), along with poor physical fitness levels. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of physical fitness for daily functioning after 3 years, in 602 older adults with borderline to profound ID (≥ 50 years). At baseline, physical fitness levels and daily functioning (operationalized as basic activities of daily living [ADL] and mobility) were assessed. After 3 years, the measurements of daily functioning were repeated. At follow-up, 12.6% of the participants were completely independent in ADL and 48.5% had no mobility limitations. More than half of the participants (54.8%) declined in their ability to perform ADL and 37.5% declined in their mobility. Manual dexterity, visual reaction time, balance, comfortable and fast gait speed, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were significant predictors for a decline in ADL. For a decline in mobility, manual dexterity, balance, comfortable and fast walking speed, grip strength, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were all significant predictors. This proves the predictive validity of these physical fitness tests for daily functioning and stresses the importance of using physical fitness tests and implementing physical fitness enhancing programs in the care for older adults with ID.

KEYWORDS:

Activities of daily living; Intellectual disabilities; Mobility; Older adults; Physical fitness

PMID:
24950015
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2014.05.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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