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Steroids. 2014 Oct;88:36-43. doi: 10.1016/j.steroids.2014.06.005. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Lipid profile in nonobese pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective controlled clinical study.

Author information

1
Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, IRCCS - ASMN, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy. Electronic address: stefanopalomba@tin.it.
2
Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, IRCCS - ASMN, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy.
3
Department of Endocrinology, University "Federico II" of Naples, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy.
4
Endocrinology, University "Parthenope" of Naples, Via Partenope, 80100 Naples, Italy.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University "Federico II" of Naples, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy.
6
Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, IRCCS - ASMN, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy; University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Università 4, 41100 Modena, Italy.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University "Magna Graecia" of Catanzaro, Viale Europa, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy.

Abstract

Alterations in lipid pattern and increased risk for obstetric/neonatal complications have been observed in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Pregnancy leads to physiologic changes in lipoprotein metabolism, and alterations in lipid profile have been related with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Based on these considerations, the aim of the present prospective controlled clinical study was to test the hypothesis that the changes in the lipid profile in patients with PCOS during pregnancy are characteristic and potentially related to the increased risk of obstetric/neonatal complications. One hundred and fifty nonobese PCOS women and 150 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Serum lipids, glucose, insulin, and androgens levels were serially assayed in all subjects before and throughout pregnancy. Serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations were significantly (P<0.05) higher in PCOS group than in healthy controls at each assessment. Throughout pregnancy, serum LDL and TG levels increased significantly (P<0.05) in both groups, although the change from pre-pregnancy values was significantly (P<0.05) greater in PCOS patients than in healthy controls. A significant (P<0.05) relationship was observed between serum LDL and TG changes and changes in both insulin sensitivity indexes and androgen levels in PCOS patients alone. After adjusting for maternal age, pre-pregnancy BMI and lipid levels, body weight gain, and insulin-resistance markers, serum TG concentrations during pregnancy were directly and independently associated with obstetric complications in both groups, whereas serum LDL levels only in PCOS patients. We can conclude that nonobese PCOS patients had specific changes in lipid profile during pregnancy, and that the lipid pattern typical of PCOS may account for the more frequent adverse pregnancy outcomes. PCOS-related hormonal and metabolic features, such as insulin resistance and high androgen levels, may mediate this phenomenon.

KEYWORDS:

Androgens; Insulin-resistance; Lipids; Lipoproteins; PCOS; Pregnancy

PMID:
24945113
DOI:
10.1016/j.steroids.2014.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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