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Clin Rehabil. 2014 Dec;28(12):1159-71. doi: 10.1177/0269215514536210. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

Motivational interviewing to increase physical activity in people with chronic health conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia p.ohalloran@latrobe.edu.au.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia Northern Health, Australia.
4
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Australia.
5
Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, Australia.
6
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Australia.
7
Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Australia Department of Occupational Therapy, Alfred Health, Australia.
8
Northern Health, Australia Eastern Health, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to determine if motivational interviewing leads to increased physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity in people with chronic health conditions.

DATA SOURCES:

Seven electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL, SPORTDiscus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials) were searched from inception until January 2014.

TRIAL SELECTION:

Two reviewers independently examined publications for inclusion. Trials were included if participants were adults (>18 years), had a chronic health condition, used motivational interviewing as the intervention and examined physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Two reviewers independently extracted data. Risk of bias within trials was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Meta-analyses were conducted with standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence.

RESULTS:

Eleven publications (of ten trials) were included. There was moderate level evidence that motivational interviewing had a small effect in increasing physical activity levels in people with chronic health conditions relative to comparison groups (standardized mean differences = 0.19, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.32, p = 0.004). Sensitivity analysis based on trials that confirmed treatment fidelity produced a larger effect. No conclusive evidence was observed for cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity.

CONCLUSION:

The addition of motivational interviewing to usual care may lead to modest improvements in physical activity for people with chronic health conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiorespiratory fitness; motivational interviewing; physical activity; systematic review

PMID:
24942478
DOI:
10.1177/0269215514536210
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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