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Afr Health Sci. 2013 Dec;13(4):857-63. doi: 10.4314/ahs.v13i4.1.

Impact of moderate versus mild aerobic exercise training on inflammatory cytokines in obese type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physical therapy, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.
2
Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recently some plasma biomarkers of inflammation have been recognized as important cardiovascular risk factors. There is little information about the effects of aerobic exercise training on these biomarkers and the risk of metabolic complications in obese type 2 diabetes patients.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the impact of moderate versus mild aerobic exercise training on the inflammatory cytokines in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

METHODS:

Fifty obese type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes with body mass index (BMI) varying from 31 to 36 kg/m(2), non smokers, free from respiratory, kidney, liver, metabolic and neurological disorders, participated in this study. Their age ranged from 40 to 55 years. The subjects were included into two equal groups; the first group (A) received moderate aerobic exercise training. The second group (B) received mild aerobic exercise training, three times / week for 3 months.

RESULTS:

The mean values of leptin, TNF- alpha, IL2, IL4, IL6, HOMA-IR and HBA1c were significantly decreased in group (A) and group (B). Also, there were significant differences between both groups after treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Moderate aerobic exercise training modulates inflammatory cytokines more than mild aerobic exercise training in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic exercise; inflammatory cytokines; non-insulin dependent diabetes; obesity

PMID:
24940305
PMCID:
PMC4056484
DOI:
10.4314/ahs.v13i4.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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