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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Sep;23(9):1938-43. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0266. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Cigarette smoking and pulmonary function in adult survivors of childhood cancer exposed to pulmonary-toxic therapy: results from the St. Jude lifetime cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
2
Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
3
Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
4
Department of General Pediatrics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. daniel.green@stjude.org.

Abstract

Treatments for childhood cancer can impair pulmonary function. We assessed the potential impact of cigarette smoking on pulmonary function in 433 adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) who received pulmonary-toxic therapy, using single breath diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide corrected for hemoglobin (DLCOcorr), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and total lung capacity (TLC). FEV1/FVC median values among current [1.00; interquartile range (IQR): 0.94-1.04] and former smokers (0.98; IQR: 0.93-1.04) were lower than those who had never smoked (1.02; IQR: 0.96-1.06; P = 0.003). Median FEV1/FVC values were lower among those who smoked ≥ 6 pack-years (0.99; IQR: 0.92-1.03) and those who smoked <6 pack-years (1.00; IQR: 0.94-1.04), than among those who had never smoked (P = 0.005). Our findings suggest that CCSs have an increased risk for future obstructive and restrictive lung disease. Follow-up is needed to determine whether smoking imparts more than additive risk. Smoking prevention and cessation need to be a priority in this population.

PMID:
24939744
PMCID:
PMC4167598
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0266
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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