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Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 18;5:4120. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5120.

Inertio-elastic focusing of bioparticles in microchannels at high throughput.

Author information

1
1] Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA [2] Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [3].
2
1] Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2].
3
Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA.
4
LaVision Inc., Ypsilanti, Michigan 48197, USA.
5
1] Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA [2] Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, Korea.
6
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.
7
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Abstract

Controlled manipulation of particles from very large volumes of fluid at high throughput is critical for many biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. One promising approach is to use microfluidic technologies that rely on fluid inertia or elasticity to drive lateral migration of particles to stable equilibrium positions in a microchannel. Here, we report on a hydrodynamic approach that enables deterministic focusing of beads, mammalian cells and anisotropic hydrogel particles in a microchannel at extremely high flow rates. We show that on addition of micromolar concentrations of hyaluronic acid, the resulting fluid viscoelasticity can be used to control the focal position of particles at Reynolds numbers up to Re≈10,000 with corresponding flow rates and particle velocities up to 50 ml min(-1) and 130 m s(-1). This study explores a previously unattained regime of inertio-elastic fluid flow and demonstrates bioparticle focusing at flow rates that are the highest yet achieved.

PMID:
24939508
PMCID:
PMC4476514
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5120
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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