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Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 18;5:4081. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5081.

Cell cycle transition from S-phase to G1 in Caulobacter is mediated by ancestral virulence regulators.

Author information

1
Department Microbiology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine/CMU, Institute of Genetics and Genomics in Geneva (iGE3), University of Geneva, Rue Michel Servet 1, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland.
2
1] Department Microbiology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine/CMU, Institute of Genetics and Genomics in Geneva (iGE3), University of Geneva, Rue Michel Servet 1, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland [2].
3
Biozentrum of the University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50/70, 4056 Basel, Switzerland.
4
1] Biozentrum of the University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50/70, 4056 Basel, Switzerland [2].

Abstract

Zinc-finger domain transcriptional regulators regulate a myriad of functions in eukaryotes. Interestingly, ancestral versions (MucR) from Alpha-proteobacteria control bacterial virulence/symbiosis. Whether virulence regulators can also control cell cycle transcription is unknown. Here we report that MucR proteins implement a hitherto elusive primordial S→G1 transcriptional switch. After charting G1-specific promoters in the cell cycle model Caulobacter crescentus by comparative ChIP-seq, we use one such promoter as genetic proxy to unearth two MucR paralogs, MucR1/2, as constituents of a quadripartite and homeostatic regulatory module directing the S→G1 transcriptional switch. Surprisingly, MucR orthologues that regulate virulence and symbiosis gene transcription in Brucella, Agrobacterium or Sinorhizobium support this S→G1 switch in Caulobacter. Pan-genomic ChIP-seq analyses in Sinorhizobium and Caulobacter show that this module indeed targets orthologous genes. We propose that MucR proteins and possibly other virulence regulators primarily control bacterial cell cycle (G1-phase) transcription, rendering expression of target (virulence) genes periodic and in tune with the cell cycle.

PMID:
24939058
PMCID:
PMC4083442
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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