Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Addiction. 2014 Dec;109(12):2107-17. doi: 10.1111/add.12661. Epub 2014 Jul 21.

Smoking cessation in smokers who smoke menthol and non-menthol cigarettes.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (UWSMPH), Madison, WI, USA; Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, UWSMPH, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the relations of menthol cigarette use with measures of cessation success in a large comparative effectiveness trial (CET).

DESIGN:

Participants were randomized to one of six medication treatment conditions in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. All participants received six individual counseling sessions.

SETTING:

Community-based smokers in two communities in Wisconsin, USA.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 1504 adult smokers who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day during the past 6 months and reported being motivated to quit smoking. The analysis sample comprised 1439 participants: 814 white non-menthol smokers, 439 white menthol smokers and 186 African American (AA) menthol smokers. There were too few AA non-menthol smokers (n = 16) to be included in the analyses.

INTERVENTIONS:

Nicotine lozenge, nicotine patch, bupropion sustained release, nicotine patch + nicotine lozenge, bupropion + nicotine lozenge and placebo.

MEASUREMENTS:

Biochemically confirmed 7-day point-prevalence abstinence assessed at 4, 8 and 26 weeks post-quit.

FINDINGS:

In longitudinal abstinence analyses (generalized estimating equations) controlling for cessation treatment, menthol smoking was associated with reduced likelihood of smoking cessation success relative to non-menthol smoking [model-based estimates of abstinence = 31 versus 38%, respectively; odds ratio (OR) = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59, 0.86]. In addition, among menthol smokers, AA women were at especially high risk of cessation failure relative to white women (estimated abstinence = 17 versus 35%, respectively; OR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.75, 3.96; estimated abstinence rates for AA males and white males were both 30%, OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.60, 1.66).

CONCLUSION:

In the United States, smoking menthol cigarettes appears to be associated with reduced cessation success compared with non-menthol smoking, especially in African American females.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00332644.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial; gender; generalized estimating equations; longitudinal; menthol; race/ethnicity; smoking cessation; tobacco

PMID:
24938369
PMCID:
PMC4443703
DOI:
10.1111/add.12661
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center