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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 17;9(6):e99816. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099816. eCollection 2014.

Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance).

Author information

1
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.
2
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
3
Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America.
4
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States of America.
5
Toledo Community Hospital Oncology Program, Toledo, Ohio, United States of America.
6
Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Naperville, Illinois, United States of America.
8
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
9
Virginia Oncology Associates, Norfolk, Virginia, United States of America.
10
Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Mission Hospitals, Inc., Asheville, North Carolina, United States of America.
11
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
12
University of California at San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
13
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
14
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
15
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
16
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.

METHODS:

We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS:

Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68), compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend) = 0.02). The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2)) and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18) (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend) = 0.0025).

CONCLUSION:

Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

PMID:
24937507
PMCID:
PMC4061031
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0099816
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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