Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Brain Behav Immun. 2015 Jan;43:11-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2014.06.006. Epub 2014 Jun 14.

Inflammatory profiles in the BTBR mouse: how relevant are they to autism spectrum disorders?

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, UC Davis, United States; The M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California at Davis, CA, United States.
2
Department of Psychology and Education, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, United States.
3
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, UC Davis, United States; The M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California at Davis, CA, United States. Electronic address: pashwood@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of disorders characterized by core behavioral features including stereotyped interests, repetitive behaviors and impairments in communication and social interaction. In addition, widespread changes in the immune systems of individuals with ASD have been identified, in particular increased evidence of inflammation in the periphery and central nervous system. While the etiology of these disorders remains unclear, it appears that multiple gene and environmental factors are involved. The need for animal models paralleling the behavioral and immunological features of ASD is paramount to better understand the link between immune system dysregulation and behavioral deficits observed in these disorders. As such, the asocial BTBR mouse strain displays both ASD relevant behaviors and persistent immune dysregulation, providing a model system that has and continues to be instructive in understanding the complex nature of ASD.

KEYWORDS:

ASD; Autism; BTBR; Immune; Inflammation; Model; Mouse

PMID:
24937468
PMCID:
PMC4776653
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2014.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center