Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2014 Jun 17;9(6):e99851. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099851. eCollection 2014.

Von Willebrand factor regulation in patients with acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease: a pilot, case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
3
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
4
Rudolf Virchow Center for Experimental Biomedicine, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
5
The Clinical Trial Center, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

In animal models, von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in thrombus formation and propagation of ischemic stroke. However, the pathophysiological relevance of this molecule in humans, and its potential use as a biomarker for the risk and severity of ischemic stroke remains unclear. This study had two aims: to identify predictors of altered VWF levels and to examine whether VWF levels differ between acute cerebrovascular events and chronic cerebrovascular disease (CCD).

METHODS:

A case-control study was undertaken between 2010 and 2013 at our University clinic. In total, 116 patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) or transitory ischemic attack (TIA), 117 patients with CCD, and 104 healthy volunteers (HV) were included. Blood was taken at days 0, 1, and 3 in patients with AIS or TIA, and once in CCD patients and HV. VWF serum levels were measured and correlated with demographic and clinical parameters by multivariate linear regression and ANOVA.

RESULTS:

Patients with CCD (158 ± 46%) had significantly higher VWF levels than HV (113 ± 36%, P<0.001), but lower levels than AIS/TIA patients (200 ± 95%, P<0.001). Age, sex, and stroke severity influenced VWF levels (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

VWF levels differed across disease subtypes and patient characteristics. Our study confirms increased VWF levels as a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease and, moreover, suggests that it may represent a potential biomarker for stroke severity, warranting further investigation.

PMID:
24937073
PMCID:
PMC4061052
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0099851
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center