Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Stem Cell Reports. 2014 Jun 3;2(6):838-52. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.05.001. eCollection 2014 Jun 3.

Human intestinal tissue with adult stem cell properties derived from pluripotent stem cells.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3370, USA.
2
The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
3
Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 Utrecht, the Netherlands.
4
Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 Utrecht, the Netherlands ; Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Novaya str. 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025, Russia.
5
Sangamo BioSciences, Richmond, CA 94804, USA.
6
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3370, USA ; Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3840, USA.
7
The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA ; Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Novaya str. 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025, Russia ; Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Erratum in

  • Stem Cell Reports. 2014 Jul 8;3(1):215.

Abstract

Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

PMID:
24936470
PMCID:
PMC4050346
DOI:
10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center