Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Sep;23(9):1863-72. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0102. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and brain tumor risks in the INTEROCC study.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. mturner@creal.cat.
  • 2Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 3National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 4Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
  • 5University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
  • 6Unité Mixte de Recherche Epidémiologique Transport Travail Environnement Université Lyon 1/IFSTTAR, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
  • 7Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.
  • 8McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
  • 9Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.
  • 10INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval, Canada.
  • 11University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Canada.
  • 12Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel. The Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Unit, The Gertner Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
  • 13Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
  • 14International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Section of Environment and Radiation, Lyon, France.
  • 15Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumors, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumors. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumors in the large-scale INTEROCC study.

METHODS:

Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix were assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10+ years before the diagnosis/reference date.

RESULTS:

There were 3,761 included brain tumor cases (1,939 glioma and 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1 to 4 years before the diagnosis/reference date and glioma [odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs. < 25th percentile, 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.36-2.07; PLinear trend < 0.0001], and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs. < 25th percentile, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.97-1.57; PLinear trend = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma.

IMPACT:

Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumorigenesis.

PMID:
24935666
PMCID:
PMC4154968
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0102
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center