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Plant Physiol Biochem. 2014 Sep;82:105-15. doi: 10.1016/j.plaphy.2014.05.012. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

Analysis of gas exchange, stomatal behaviour and micronutrients uncovers dynamic response and adaptation of tomato plants to monochromatic light treatments.

Author information

1
School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia.
2
School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia; School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 7001, Australia.
3
School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia; School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China.
4
School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, 2751, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: Z.Chen@uws.edu.au.

Abstract

Light spectrum affects the yield and quality of greenhouse tomato, especially over a prolonged period of monochromatic light treatments. Physiological and chemical analysis was employed to investigate the influence of light spectral (blue, green and red) changes on growth, photosynthesis, stomatal behaviour, leaf pigment, and micronutrient levels. We found that plants are less affected under blue light treatment, which was evident by the maintenance of higher A, gs, Tr, and stomatal parameters and significantly lower VPD and Tleaf as compared to those plants grown in green and red light treatments. Green and red light treatments led to significantly larger increase in the accumulation of Fe, B, Zn, and Cu than blue light. Moreover, guard cell length, width, and volume all showed highly significant positive correlations to gs, Tr and negative links to VPD. There was negative impact of monochromatic lights-induced accumulation of Mn, Cu, and Zn on photosynthesis, leaf pigments and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the light-induced significant changes of the physiological traits were partially recovered at the end of experiment. A high degree of morphological and physiological plasticity to blue, green and red light treatments suggested that tomato plants may have developed mechanisms to adapt to the light treatments. Thus, understanding the optimization of light spectrum for photosynthesis and growth is one of the key components for greenhouse tomato production.

KEYWORDS:

Guard cell geometry; Micronutrients; Monochromatic light; Photosynthesis; Solanum lycopersicum L; Stomatal aperture

PMID:
24935228
DOI:
10.1016/j.plaphy.2014.05.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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