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Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2015 Nov;23(11):3168-77. doi: 10.1007/s00167-014-3110-6. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

The effect of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training in the ACL-injured knee.

Author information

1
Academic Department of Physiotherapy, School of Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. morrissey.matt@ymail.com.
3
King's College London, London, UK.
4
Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the effect of different loads of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training on anterior knee laxity and function in the ACL-injured (ACLI) knee.

METHODS:

Fifty-eight ACLI subjects were randomised to one of three (12-week duration) training groups. The STAND group trained according to a standardised rehabilitation protocol. Subjects in the LOW and HIGH group trained as did the STAND group but with the addition of seated knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20 repetition maximum (RM) and 20 sets of 2RM, respectively. Anterior knee laxity and measurements of physical and subjective function were performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Thirty-six subjects were tested at both baseline and 12 weeks (STAND n = 13, LOW n = 11, HIGH n = 12).

RESULTS:

The LOW group demonstrated a reduction in 133 N anterior knee laxity between baseline and 12 weeks testing when compared to the HIGH and the STAND groups (p = 0.009). Specifically, the trained-untrained knee laxity decreased an average of approximately 5 mm in the LOW group while remaining the same in the other two groups.

CONCLUSION:

Twelve weeks of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20RM led to a reduction in anterior knee laxity in the ACLI knee. This reduction in laxity does not appear to offer any significant short-term functional advantages when compared to a standard rehabilitation protocol. These results indicate that knee laxity can be decreased with resistance training of the thigh muscles.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Randomised controlled trial, Level II.

KEYWORDS:

Hypermobility; Joint stability; Quadriceps; Resistance training; Therapeutic exercise

PMID:
24934926
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-014-3110-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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