Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 16;5:4084. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5084.

Multi-peaked adaptive landscape for chikungunya virus evolution predicts continued fitness optimization in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Center for Tropical Diseases, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, 77555-0609 USA.
2
1] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, 30322 USA [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan [3] Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan.
3
Viral Disease Biology Program, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology (RGCB), Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695012, India.
4
Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, 47405-7000 Indiana, USA.

Abstract

Host species-specific fitness landscapes largely determine the outcome of host switching during pathogen emergence. Using chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to study adaptation to a mosquito vector, we evaluated mutations associated with recently evolved sub-lineages. Multiple Aedes albopictus-adaptive fitness peaks became available after CHIKV acquired an initial adaptive (E1-A226V) substitution, permitting rapid lineage diversification observed in nature. All second-step mutations involved replacements by glutamine or glutamic acid of E2 glycoprotein amino acids in the acid-sensitive region, providing a framework to anticipate additional A. albopictus-adaptive mutations. The combination of second-step adaptive mutations into a single, 'super-adaptive' fitness peak also predicted the future emergence of CHIKV strains with even greater transmission efficiency in some current regions of endemic circulation, followed by their likely global spread.

PMID:
24933611
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5084
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center