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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 16;9(6):e99641. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099641. eCollection 2014.

Understanding cultivar-specificity and soil determinants of the cannabis microbiome.

Author information

1
The Field Museum, Department of Science and Education, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America; Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
2
Argonne National Laboratory, Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Lemont, Illinois, United States of America; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
3
Argonne National Laboratory, Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Lemont, Illinois, United States of America; Basque Country Government, Bilbao, Spain.
4
Argonne National Laboratory, Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Lemont, Illinois, United States of America; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
5
The Field Museum, Department of Science and Education, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
6
Cannavest, San Diego, California, United States of America.
7
MO BIO Laboratories, Carlsbad, California, United States of America.
8
Argonne National Laboratory, Institute for Genomic and Systems Biology, Lemont, Illinois, United States of America; Graduate Program in Biophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

Erratum in

  • PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107415. Hartsel, Josh [corrected to Hartsel, Joshua A].

Abstract

Understanding microbial partnerships with the medicinally and economically important crop Cannabis has the potential to affect agricultural practice by improving plant fitness and production yield. Furthermore, Cannabis presents an interesting model to explore plant-microbiome interactions as it produces numerous secondary metabolic compounds. Here we present the first description of the endorhiza-, rhizosphere-, and bulk soil-associated microbiome of five distinct Cannabis cultivars. Bacterial communities of the endorhiza showed significant cultivar-specificity. When controlling cultivar and soil type the microbial community structure was significantly different between plant cultivars, soil types, and between the endorhiza, rhizosphere and soil. The influence of soil type, plant cultivar and sample type differentiation on the microbial community structure provides support for a previously published two-tier selection model, whereby community composition across sample types is determined mainly by soil type, while community structure within endorhiza samples is determined mainly by host cultivar.

PMID:
24932479
PMCID:
PMC4059704
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0099641
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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