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Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2014 Sep;18(5):618-23. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.04.007. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Clinical features of cerebral palsy in children with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

Author information

1
Children's Hospital Zagreb, University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department of Neuropediatrics, Klaiceva 16, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia.
2
Federação das Associações Portuguesas de Paralisia Cerebral FAPPC/National Epidemiological Program for Cerebral Palsy, Lisbon, Portugal.
3
Centro de Reabilitação de Paralisia Cerebral Calouste Gulbenkian Santa, Casa da Misericordia de Lisboa/National Epidemiological Program for Cerebral Palsy, Lisbon, Portugal.
4
University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Division of Paediatrics, Department of Child, Adolescent and Developmental Neurology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
5
University of Pecs, Department of Paediatrics, Pecs, Hungary.
6
Medical University Innsbruck, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics I, Innsbruck, Austria.
7
University Children's Hospital Tübingen, Department of Child Neurology, Tübingen, Germany.
8
Children's Hospital Zagreb, University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department of Neuropediatrics, Klaiceva 16, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. Electronic address: vlatka.mejaskibosnjak@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of vertically transmitted viral infection, affecting around 1% of liveborns. Infection is symptomatic in nearly 10% of infected children who are at higher risk of development of severe neurological disorders, including cerebral palsy.

AIMS:

To study the clinical profile of children with cerebral palsy caused by symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection in a multicenter study involving six countries from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE) Network.

METHODS:

Data on 35 children (13 males, 22 females; mean age at last assessment 12y 6mo, age range 14y 6mo, min 4y, max 18y 6mo) on pre/peri/neonatal history and last clinical assessment were collected. Classification of cerebral palsy and associated impairments was performed according to SCPE criteria.

RESULTS:

The majority of children had bilateral spastic cerebral palsy, 85.7%, with a confidence interval (CI) [69.7-95.2], and 71.4% [CI 53.7-85.4] were unable to walk (GMFCS levels IV-V) while fine motor function was severely affected in 62.8% [CI 44.9-78.5] (BFMF levels IV and V). Most of the children with severe CP had severe associated impairments. 11.4% of children had severe visual and 42.8% severe hearing impairment, 77.1% [CI 59.9-89.6] suffered from epilepsy, also 77.1% had severe intellectual impairment, and speech was undeveloped in 71.4%. Female:male ratio was 1.69:1 and 80% of children were term born.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cerebral palsy following symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection seems to be in most cases a severe condition and associated impairments are overrepresented.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral palsy; Children; Neurological impairment; Symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection

PMID:
24931914
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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