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Scand J Prim Health Care. 2014 Jun;32(2):55-61. doi: 10.3109/02813432.2014.929811. Epub 2014 Jun 15.

Increased primary health care use in the first year after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

Author information

1
Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen , Groningen , The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The view that the general practitioner (GP) should be more involved during the curative treatment of cancer is gaining support. This study aimed to assess the current role of the GP during treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

DESIGN:

Historical prospective study, using primary care data from two cohorts.

SETTING:

Registration Network Groningen (RNG) consisting of 18 GPs in three group practices with a dynamic population of about 30,000 patients.

SUBJECTS:

Patients who underwent curative treatment for CRC (n = 124) and matched primary care patients without CRC (reference population; n = 358).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Primary healthcare use in the period 1998-2009.

FINDINGS:

Patients with CRC had higher primary healthcare use in the year after diagnosis compared with the reference population. After correction for age, gender, and consultation behaviour, CRC patients had 54% (range 23-92%) more face-to-face contacts, 68% (range 36-108%) more drug prescriptions, and 35% (range -4-90%) more referrals compared with reference patients. Patients consulted their GP more often for reasons related to anaemia, abdominal pain, constipation, skin problems, and urinary infections. GPs also prescribed more acid reflux drugs, laxatives, anti-anaemic preparations, analgesics, and psycholeptics for CRC patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The GP plays a significant role in the year after CRC diagnosis. This role may be associated with treatment-related side effects and psychological problems. Formal guidelines on the involvement of the GP during CRC treatment might ensure more effective allocation and communication of care between primary and secondary healthcare services.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; The Netherlands; general practitioners; healthcare use; primary health care

PMID:
24931639
PMCID:
PMC4075017
DOI:
10.3109/02813432.2014.929811
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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