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N Engl J Med. 2014 Jul 24;371(4):313-325. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1314474. Epub 2014 Jun 15.

Outpatient glycemic control with a bionic pancreas in type 1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Diabetes Unit and Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (S.J.R., M.S., K.L.M, L.G.G., C.B., M.A.H., D.M.N.), and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University (F.H.E.-K., K.M., E.R.D.) - both in Boston.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions.

METHODS:

In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, "bionic" pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon.

RESULTS:

Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P=0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P=0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P=0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both adults and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01762059 and NCT01833988.).

PMID:
24931572
PMCID:
PMC4183762
DOI:
10.1056/NEJMoa1314474
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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