Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 24;111(25):9283-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1408296111. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Recovery of consciousness is mediated by a network of discrete metastable activity states.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095;
2
Laboratory for Neurobiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065; and.
3
Laboratory for Neurobiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065; and proekt@gmail.com pfaff@rockefeller.edu.
4
Laboratory for Neurobiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065; andDepartment of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10021 proekt@gmail.com pfaff@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

It is not clear how, after a large perturbation, the brain explores the vast space of potential neuronal activity states to recover those compatible with consciousness. Here, we analyze recovery from pharmacologically induced coma to show that neuronal activity en route to consciousness is confined to a low-dimensional subspace. In this subspace, neuronal activity forms discrete metastable states persistent on the scale of minutes. The network of transitions that links these metastable states is structured such that some states form hubs that connect groups of otherwise disconnected states. Although many paths through the network are possible, to ultimately enter the activity state compatible with consciousness, the brain must first pass through these hubs in an orderly fashion. This organization of metastable states, along with dramatic dimensionality reduction, significantly simplifies the task of sampling the parameter space to recover the state consistent with wakefulness on a physiologically relevant timescale.

KEYWORDS:

anesthesia; emergence; spectral analysis; state transitions

PMID:
24927558
PMCID:
PMC4078822
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1408296111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center