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Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Oct;122(10):1059-65. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1408198. Epub 2014 Jun 13.

Long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water and diabetes incidence: a prospective study of the diet, cancer and health cohort.

Author information

1
Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Established causes of diabetes do not fully explain the present epidemic. High-level arsenic exposure has been implicated in diabetes risk, but the effect of low-level arsenic exposure in drinking water remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to determine whether long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water in Denmark is associated with an increased risk of diabetes using a large prospective cohort.

METHODS:

During 1993-1997, we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for diabetes occurrence from enrollment until 31 December 2006. We traced and geocoded residential addresses of the cohort members and used a geographic information system to link addresses with water-supply areas. We estimated individual exposure to arsenic using all addresses from 1 January 1971 until the censoring date. Cox proportional hazards models were used to model the association between arsenic exposure and diabetes incidence, separately for two definitions of diabetes: all cases and a more strict definition in which cases of diabetes based solely on blood glucose results were excluded.

RESULTS:

Over a mean follow-up period of 9.7 years for 52,931 eligible participants, there were a total of 4,304 (8.1%) diabetes cases, and 3,035 (5.8%) cases of diabetes based on the more strict definition. The adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) per 1-μg/L increment in arsenic levels in drinking water were as follows: IRR = 1.03 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.06) and IRR = 1.02 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.05) for all and strict diabetes cases, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water may contribute to the development of diabetes.

PMID:
24927198
PMCID:
PMC4181933
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.1408198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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