Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Science. 2014 Jun 13;344(6189):1242281. doi: 10.1126/science.1242281. Epub 2014 Jun 12.

Stem cell plasticity. Plasticity of epithelial stem cells in tissue regeneration.

Author information

1
Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Biologie Humaine et Moléculaire (IRIBHM), Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels B-1070, Belgium. Walloon Excellence in Life Sciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels B-1070, Belgium. fuchslb@rockefeller.edu cedric.blanpain@ulb.ac.be.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. fuchslb@rockefeller.edu cedric.blanpain@ulb.ac.be.

Abstract

Tissues rely upon stem cells for homeostasis and repair. Recent studies show that the fate and multilineage potential of epithelial stem cells can change depending on whether a stem cell exists within its resident niche and responds to normal tissue homeostasis, whether it is mobilized to repair a wound, or whether it is taken from its niche and challenged to de novo tissue morphogenesis after transplantation. In this Review, we discuss how different populations of naturally lineage-restricted stem cells and committed progenitors can display remarkable plasticity and reversibility and reacquire long-term self-renewing capacities and multilineage differentiation potential during physiological and regenerative conditions. We also discuss the implications of cellular plasticity for regenerative medicine and for cancer.

PMID:
24926024
PMCID:
PMC4523269
DOI:
10.1126/science.1242281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center