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Science. 2014 Jun 13;344(6189):1250-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1253050.

Neuronal repair. Asynchronous therapy restores motor control by rewiring of the rat corticospinal tract after stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. schwab@hifo.uzh.ch wahl@hifo.uzh.ch.
2
Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
3
Computer Vision Group, Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing and Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
5
Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
6
National Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institute of Natural Sciences Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan.

Abstract

The brain exhibits limited capacity for spontaneous restoration of lost motor functions after stroke. Rehabilitation is the prevailing clinical approach to augment functional recovery, but the scientific basis is poorly understood. Here, we show nearly full recovery of skilled forelimb functions in rats with large strokes when a growth-promoting immunotherapy against a neurite growth-inhibitory protein was applied to boost the sprouting of new fibers, before stabilizing the newly formed circuits by intensive training. In contrast, early high-intensity training during the growth phase destroyed the effect and led to aberrant fiber patterns. Pharmacogenetic experiments identified a subset of corticospinal fibers originating in the intact half of the forebrain, side-switching in the spinal cord to newly innervate the impaired limb and restore skilled motor function.

PMID:
24926013
DOI:
10.1126/science.1253050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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