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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2015 Jan;82(1):106-14. doi: 10.1111/cen.12523. Epub 2014 Jul 18.

Specific behaviour, mood and personality traits may contribute to obesity in patients with craniopharyngioma.

Author information

1
Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, Klinikum der Universität München, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Patients with craniopharyngioma (CP) often suffer from obesity, but the underlying causes are still not fully understood. We compared CP to patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) and to a control group (CG) using standardized questionnaires to investigate whether behavioural, mood or personality traits contribute to obesity.

METHODS:

We compared 31 patients with CP (42% male, 53 ± 15·1 years) to 26 patients with NFPA (71% male, 63·2 ± 10·3 years) and to age- and gender-matched local CG (ratio 2:1). Normative data from the literature are included for reference. Patients were asked to complete eleven standardized questionnaires. Two questionnaires were used to evaluate eating disorders (FEV, EDE-Q), one depression (BDI), one anxiety (STAI), three health-related quality of life (SF-36, EuroQoL, QoL-AGHDA), one sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), two personality (EPQ-RK, TPQ) and one body image (FKB-20).

RESULTS:

Patients with CP scored significantly higher in conscious hunger perception (FEV, CP 5·8 ± 3·2 scores, NFPA 3·6 ± 3·3 scores, CG 3·0 ± 2·5, P < 0·001). They had similar scores for BDI compared with NFPA, but higher scores to CG (P < 0·001, CP 10·6 ± 8·3, NFPA 7·5 ± 5·7, CG 4·96 ± 4·2). CP and NFPA scored higher than CG for anxiety and personality traits such as harm avoidance, fatigability and asthenia and slightly higher for neuroticism. No differences were seen for EDE-Q, quality of life, daytime sleepiness and body image between CP and NFPA. However, differences could be observed to normative data from the literature.

CONCLUSION:

Obesity in patients with CP might be influenced by eating disorders, negative mood alterations and increased anxiety-related personality traits.

PMID:
24923438
DOI:
10.1111/cen.12523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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