Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Accid Anal Prev. 2014 Oct;71:120-8. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2014.04.013. Epub 2014 Jun 10.

A preliminary study of sexual activity as a distraction for young drivers.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology 414 East Clark St. University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069, USA. Electronic address: cindysj@usd.edu.
2
Department of Psychology 414 East Clark St. University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069, USA. Electronic address: sam.gaster@coyotes.usd.edu.
3
Department of Computer Science 414 East Clark St. University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069, USA. Electronic address: davesj@usd.edu.

Erratum in

  • Accid Anal Prev. 2015 Jan;74:368.

Abstract

In what may be the first in-depth study of sexual activity as a driving distraction in the US, a sample of 195 male and 511 female college students at a Midwestern university (M age=19.7) participated in an on-line study of sex while driving (SWD). Of these, 64 (32.8%) men and 47 (9.3%) women had engaged in sex while driving (SWD). Nine percent of men and 29% of women had engaged in SWD as a passenger. In most recent SWD incidents, respondents reported that the two most common acts were oral sex (70.3%) and genital touching (60.4%). About 11% engaged in vaginal intercourse. Sexual activity lasted from 1 to 10min for 42.7% of the respondents. Nearly half (49.1%) were traveling 61-80mph during sex. Considering respondents' lifetime incidents of SWD, the most common driving errors reported were speeding (37.8%), drifting into another lane (36%), and letting go of the steering wheel (10.8%). Only 1.8% nearly had a crash, and none actually had a crash. Separate regression analyses for male and female respondents revealed that lower intentions to engage in SWD in the future were associated with higher estimates of the probability of a car crash. The authors consider SWD to be an under-reported in-vehicle distraction and encourage more research and prevention efforts.

KEYWORDS:

Distracted driving; Sex while driving; Young drivers

PMID:
24922612
DOI:
10.1016/j.aap.2014.04.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center