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J Neurophysiol. 2014 Sep 15;112(6):1566-83. doi: 10.1152/jn.00179.2013. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

A high-density, high-channel count, multiplexed μECoG array for auditory-cortex recordings.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut;
2
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut;
3
Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, New York; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York;
4
Center for Nanoparticle Research of Institute for Basic Science, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea;
5
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut;
6
Bioengineering Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
7
Neuroscience Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
8
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York;
9
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois;
10
Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
11
Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois;
12
State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China;
13
Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China;
14
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
15
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Neuroscience, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ycohen@mail.med.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Our understanding of the large-scale population dynamics of neural activity is limited, in part, by our inability to record simultaneously from large regions of the cortex. Here, we validated the use of a large-scale active microelectrode array that simultaneously records 196 multiplexed micro-electrocortigraphical (μECoG) signals from the cortical surface at a very high density (1,600 electrodes/cm(2)). We compared μECoG measurements in auditory cortex using a custom "active" electrode array to those recorded using a conventional "passive" μECoG array. Both of these array responses were also compared with data recorded via intrinsic optical imaging, which is a standard methodology for recording sound-evoked cortical activity. Custom active μECoG arrays generated more veridical representations of the tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex than current commercially available passive μECoG arrays. Furthermore, the cortical representation could be measured efficiently with the active arrays, requiring as little as 13.5 s of neural data acquisition. Next, we generated spectrotemporal receptive fields from the recorded neural activity on the active μECoG array and identified functional organizational principles comparable to those observed using intrinsic metabolic imaging and single-neuron recordings. This new electrode array technology has the potential for large-scale, temporally precise monitoring and mapping of the cortex, without the use of invasive penetrating electrodes.

KEYWORDS:

auditory cortex; electrocorticography; tonotopy; topography; μECoG

PMID:
24920021
PMCID:
PMC4137255
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00179.2013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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