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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 11;9(2):e97631. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0097631. eCollection 2014.

Long-term MRI cell tracking after intraventricular delivery in a patient with global cerebral ischemia and prospects for magnetic navigation of stem cells within the CSF.

Author information

1
NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; Department of Neurosurgery, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Magnetic Resonance Research, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
2
Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Magnetic Resonance Research, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, The Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
4
Department of Radiology, Magnetic Resonance Unit, The Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
5
NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
6
Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Magnetic Resonance Research, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term clinical tracking of magnetically labeled stem cells after intracerebroventricular transplantation as well as to investigate in vitro feasibility for magnetic guidance of cell therapy within large fluid compartments.

METHOD:

After approval by our Institutional Review Board, an 18-month-old patient, diagnosed as being in a vegetative state due to global cerebral ischemia, underwent cell transplantation to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle, with umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agent. The patient was followed over 33 months with clinical examinations and MRI. To evaluate the forces governing the distribution of cells within the fluid compartment of the ventricular system in vivo, a gravity-driven sedimentation assay and a magnetic field-driven cell attraction assay were developed in vitro.

RESULTS:

Twenty-four hours post-transplantation, MR imaging (MRI) was able to detect hypointense cells in the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. The signal gradually decreased over 4 months and became undetectable at 33 months. In vitro, no significant difference in cell sedimentation between SPIO-labeled and unlabeled cells was observed (p = NS). An external magnet was effective in attracting cells over distances comparable to the size of human lateral ventricles.

CONCLUSIONS:

MR imaging of SPIO-labeled cells allows monitoring of cells within lateral ventricles. While the initial biodistribution is governed by gravity-driven sedimentation, an external magnetic field may possibly be applied to further direct the distribution of labeled cells within large fluid compartments such as the ventricular system.

PMID:
24919061
PMCID:
PMC4053317
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0097631
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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