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Thorax. 2015 Apr;70(4):376-8. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204114. Epub 2014 Jun 10.

The cost of treating severe refractory asthma in the UK: an economic analysis from the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Registry.

Author information

1
JE Cairnes School of Business and Economics, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
2
Centre for Infection and Immunity, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, UK.
3
Centre for Public Health, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, UK.
4
Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK.
5
MAHSC, The University of Manchester & UHSM, Manchester, UK.
6
Severe and Brittle Asthma Unit, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK.
7
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.
8
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammation, University of Glasgow and Gartnavel General, Glasgow, UK.
9
Department of Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Institute for Lung Health, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.

Abstract

Severe refractory asthma poses a substantial burden in terms of healthcare costs but relatively little is known about the factors which drive these costs. This study uses data from the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Registry (n=596) to estimate direct healthcare treatment costs from an National Health Service perspective and examines factors that explain variations in costs. Annual mean treatment costs among severe refractory asthma patients were £2912 (SD £2212) to £4217 (SD £2449). Significant predictors of costs were FEV1% predicted, location of care, maintenance oral corticosteroid treatment and body mass index. Treating individuals with severe refractory asthma presents a substantial cost to the health service.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Health Economist

PMID:
24917087
DOI:
10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204114
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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