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Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2014 Nov-Dec;10(6):1166-73. doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Pregnancy outcomes and nutritional indices after 3 types of bariatric surgery performed at a single institution.

Author information

1
Nutrition Support and Morbid Obesity Unit, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece; Nutrition Department, University Hospital of Patras, Greece. Electronic address: ncmead@upatras.gr.
2
Nutrition Department, University Hospital of Patras, Greece.
3
Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece.
6
Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece; Nutrition Support and Morbid Obesity Unit, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nutritional status during pregnancy and the effects of nutritional deficiencies on pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery is an important issue that warrants further study. The objective of this study was to investigate pregnancy outcomes and nutritional indices after restrictive and malabsorptive procedures.

METHODS:

We investigated pregnancy outcomes of 113 women who gave birth to 150 children after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) between June 1994 and December 2011. Biochemical indices and pregnancy outcomes were compared among the different types of surgery and to overall 20-year hospital data, as well as to 56 presurgery pregnancies in 36 women of the same group.

RESULTS:

Anemia was observed in 24.2% and 15.6% of pregnancies after BPD and RYGB, respectively. Vitamin B12 levels decreased postoperatively in all groups, with no further decrease during pregnancy; however, low levels were observed not only after BPD (11.7%) and RYGB (15.6%), but also after SG (13.3%). Folic acid levels increased. Serum albumin levels decreased in all groups during pregnancy, but hypoproteinemia was seen only after BPD. Neonates after BPD had significantly lower average birth weight without a higher frequency of low birth weight defined as<2500 g. A comparison of neonatal data between babies born before surgery and siblings born after surgery (AS) showed that AS newborns had lower average birth weight with no significant differences in body length or head circumference and no cases of macrosomia.

CONCLUSION:

Our study showed reasonably good pregnancy outcomes in this sample population after all types of bariatric surgery provided nutritional supplement guidelines are followed. Closer monitoring is required in pregnancies after malabsorptive procedures especially regarding protein nutrition.

KEYWORDS:

Anemia; Bariatric surgery; Birth weight; Folic acid; Gestational age; Macrosomia; Neonatal outcomes; Nutritional indices; Pregnancy; Protein malnutrition; Vitamin B(12)

PMID:
24913588
DOI:
10.1016/j.soard.2014.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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