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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014 Aug;58(8):4971-3. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02889-14. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase status and risk of hemolysis in Plasmodium falciparum-infected African children receiving single-dose primaquine.

Author information

1
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
2
Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda.
4
Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda Department of Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda.
5
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
6
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom teun.bousema@lshtm.ac.uk.

Abstract

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme function and genotype were determined in Ugandan children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria enrolled in a primaquine trial after exclusion of severe G6PD deficiency by fluorescent spot test. G6PD A- heterozygotes and hemizygotes/homozygotes experienced dose-dependent lower hemoglobin concentrations after treatment. No severe anemia was observed.

PMID:
24913169
PMCID:
PMC4136063
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.02889-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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