Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 17;111(24):8873-6. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1316902111. Epub 2014 May 27.

Vaccinating captive chimpanzees to save wild chimpanzees.

Author information

1
Integrated BioTherapeutics, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD 20878;
2
New Iberia Research Center, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, New Iberia, LA 70562-3610;
3
Division of Virology, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702; and.
4
Department of Archaelogy and Anthropology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QG, United Kingdom pdw36@cam.ac.uk.

Abstract

Infectious disease has only recently been recognized as a major threat to the survival of Endangered chimpanzees and Critically Endangered gorillas in the wild. One potentially powerful tool, vaccination, has not been deployed in fighting this disease threat, in good part because of fears about vaccine safety. Here we report on what is, to our knowledge, the first trial in which captive chimpanzees were used to test a vaccine intended for use on wild apes rather than humans. We tested a virus-like particle vaccine against Ebola virus, a leading source of death in wild gorillas and chimpanzees. The vaccine was safe and immunogenic. Captive trials of other vaccines and of methods for vaccine delivery hold great potential as weapons in the fight against wild ape extinction.

KEYWORDS:

conservation; filovirus; wildlife disease

PMID:
24912183
PMCID:
PMC4066532
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1316902111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center