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Curr Opin Microbiol. 2014 Aug;20:76-81. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2014.05.004. Epub 2014 Jun 7.

An evolving arsenal: viral RNA detection by RIG-I-like receptors.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, United States; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, United States.
2
Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, United States.
3
Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, United States.
4
Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, United States; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, United States. Electronic address: anna.pyle@yale.edu.

Abstract

RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) utilize a specialized, multi-domain architecture to detect and respond to invasion by a diverse set of viruses. Structural similarities among these receptors provide a general mechanism for double strand RNA recognition and signal transduction. However, each RLR has developed unique strategies for sensing the specific molecular determinants on subgroups of viral RNAs. As a means to circumvent the antiviral response, viruses escape RLR detection by degrading, or sequestering or modifying their RNA. Patterns of variation in RLR sequence reveal a continuous evolution of the protein domains that contribute to RNA recognition and signaling.

PMID:
24912143
DOI:
10.1016/j.mib.2014.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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