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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 9;9(6):e99300. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099300. eCollection 2014.

Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

Author information

1
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Plasma Bioscience and Display, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Plasma Display Panel Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Plasma Bioscience and Display, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

PMID:
24911947
PMCID:
PMC4049833
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0099300
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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