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Nat Biotechnol. 2014 Jun;32(6):545-50. doi: 10.1038/nbt.2891. Epub 2014 Jun 6.

The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) provides a community standard for communicating designs in synthetic biology.

Author information

1
Biomedical and Health Informatics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Synthetic Biology Unit, Life Technologies, Carlsbad, California, USA.
3
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
School of Computing Science, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
5
Autodesk Research, Autodesk, San Francisco, California, USA.
6
Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
7
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
8
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.
9
Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
10
Raytheon BBN Technologies, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
11
Fuels Synthesis Division, Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), Berkeley, California, USA.
12
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
13
IRIC, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
14
Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.
15
Molecular Tools Laboratory, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, California, USA.
16
Clark & Parsia, Arlington, Massachusetts, USA.
17
Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.
18
DNA2.0, Menlo Park, California, USA.
19
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Abstract

The re-use of previously validated designs is critical to the evolution of synthetic biology from a research discipline to an engineering practice. Here we describe the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a proposed data standard for exchanging designs within the synthetic biology community. SBOL represents synthetic biology designs in a community-driven, formalized format for exchange between software tools, research groups and commercial service providers. The SBOL Developers Group has implemented SBOL as an XML/RDF serialization and provides software libraries and specification documentation to help developers implement SBOL in their own software. We describe early successes, including a demonstration of the utility of SBOL for information exchange between several different software tools and repositories from both academic and industrial partners. As a community-driven standard, SBOL will be updated as synthetic biology evolves to provide specific capabilities for different aspects of the synthetic biology workflow.

PMID:
24911500
DOI:
10.1038/nbt.2891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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