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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 9;9(6):e98407. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098407. eCollection 2014.

Evaluation and validation of a method for determining platelet catecholamine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and arterial hypertension.

Author information

1
Psychobiology Department of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
2
Cardiology Department of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
3
Psychobiology Department of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil; Associação Fundo de Incentivo a Pesquisa - AFIP- São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Measurements of plasma and urinary catecholamine are susceptible to confounding factors that influence the results, complicating the interpretation of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in the Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and arterial hypertension (HYP) conditions.

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we validated a test for platelet catecholamine and compared the catecholamine levels (adrenaline and noradrenaline) in urine, plasma and platelets in patients with OSA and HYP compared with controls.

METHODS:

In the validation, 30 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers who were not currently undergoing treatment or medication were selected as the control group. One hundred fifty-four individuals (114 OSA, 40 non-OSA) were consecutively selected from the outpatient clinic of the Sleep Institute and underwent clinical, polysomnographic and laboratory evaluation, including the urinary, plasma and platelet levels of adrenaline (AD) and noradrenaline (NA). Patients were then allocated to groups according to the presence of OSA and/or hypertension.

RESULTS:

A logistic regression model, controlled for age and BMI, showed that urinary AD and urinary NA were risk factors in the OSA+HYP group and the HYP group; however, the model showed higher levels of platelet NA for OSA without HYP. After 1 year of CPAP (continuous upper airway pressure) treatment, patients (n = 9) presented lower levels of urinary NA (p = 0.04) and platelet NA (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Urinary NA and AD levels were significantly associated with the condition of hypertension with and without OSA, whereas platelet NA with OSA without comorbidity. These findings suggest that platelet catecholamine levels might reflect nocturnal sympathetic activation in OSA patients without hypertension.

PMID:
24911183
PMCID:
PMC4049580
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0098407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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