Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Oct;95(10):1912-7. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.05.016. Epub 2014 Jun 6.

Comparison of mirror, raw video, and real-time visual biofeedback for training toe-out gait in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: michael.hunt@ubc.ca.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare performance error and perceived difficulty during toe-out gait modification in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) across 3 different types of visual feedback: mirror, raw video, and real-time biofeedback of toe-out angle.

DESIGN:

Repeated-measures, within-subject trial.

SETTING:

University motion analysis laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

Individuals with knee OA (N=20; 11 women; mean age, 65.4±9.8y) participated in this study. Seven participants had mild knee OA, 9 had moderate knee OA, and 4 had severe knee OA.

INTERVENTIONS:

Participants were trained to walk on a treadmill while matching a target indicating a 10° increase in stance phase toe-out compared with toe-out angle measured during self-selected walking. The target was provided visually via the 3 types of feedback listed above and were presented in a random order.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Kinematic data were collected and used to calculate the difference between the target angle and the actual performed angle for each condition (toe-out performance error). Difficulty was assessed using a numerical rating scale (0-10) provided verbally by participants.

RESULTS:

Toe-out performance error was significantly less when using the real-time biofeedback method than when using the other 2 methods (P=.025; mean difference vs mirror=2.05°; mean difference vs raw video=1.51°). Perceived difficulty was not statistically different between the groups (P=.51).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although statistically significant, the 2° difference in toe-out gait performance error may not necessitate the large economic and personnel costs of real-time biofeedback as a means to modify movement in clinical or research settings.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise movement techniques; Feedback; Gait; Knee osteoarthritis; Rehabilitation

PMID:
24910929
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2014.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center