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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Aug 6;172(1-2):72-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.05.001. Epub 2014 May 15.

Molecular characterization of Belgian pseudorabies virus isolates from domestic swine and wild boar.

Author information

1
Enzootic and (Re)emerging Diseases, Operational Direction Viral Diseases, CODA-CERVA, Groeselenberg 99, 1180 Ukkel, Belgium. Electronic address: Sara.verpoest@coda-cerva.be.
2
Enzootic and (Re)emerging Diseases, Operational Direction Viral Diseases, CODA-CERVA, Groeselenberg 99, 1180 Ukkel, Belgium. Electronic address: Brigitte.cay@coda-cerva.be.
3
Enzootic and (Re)emerging Diseases, Operational Direction Viral Diseases, CODA-CERVA, Groeselenberg 99, 1180 Ukkel, Belgium. Electronic address: Nick.deregge@coda-cerva.be.

Abstract

Aujeszky's disease is an economically important disease in domestic swine caused by suid herpesvirus 1, also called pseudorabies virus (PRV). In several European countries, including Belgium, the virus has successfully been eradicated from the domestic swine population. The presence of PRV in the wild boar population however poses a risk for possible reintroduction of the virus into the domestic pig population. It is therefore important to assess the genetic relatedness between circulating strains and possible epidemiological links. In this study, nine historical Belgian domestic swine isolates that circulated before 1990 and five recent wild boar isolates obtained since 2006 from Belgium and the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg were genetically characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and phylogenetic analysis. While all wild boar isolates were characterized as type I RFLP genotypes, the RFLP patterns of the domestic swine isolates suggest that a shift from genotype I to genotype II might have occurred in the 1980s in the domestic population. By phylogenetic analysis, Belgian wild boar isolates belonging to both clade A and B were observed, while all domestic swine isolates clustered within clade A. The joint phylogenetic analysis of both wild boar and domestic swine strains showed that some isolates with identical sequences were present within both populations, raising the question whether these strains represent an increased risk for reintroduction of the virus into the domestic population.

KEYWORDS:

Aujeszky's disease; Domestic pigs; Phylogenetic analysis; Pseudorabies virus; Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP); Wild boar

PMID:
24908275
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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