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Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2014 Dec;29(8):749-54. doi: 10.1177/1533317514536597. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

A selective egocentric topographical working memory deficit in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease: a preliminary study.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy filippo.bianchini@uniroma1.it.
2
Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy.
3
Psychology Department, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy.
4
Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy Life, Health and Environmental Science Department, University of L'Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy.
5
Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology Unit, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome Italy.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether an egocentric topographical working memory (WM) deficit is present in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with respect to other forms of visuospatial WM. Further, we would investigate whether this deficit could be present in patients having AD without topographical disorientation (TD) signs in everyday life assessed through an informal interview to caregivers. Seven patients with AD and 20 healthy participants performed the Walking Corsi Test and the Corsi Block-Tapping Test. The former test requires memorizing a sequence of places by following a path and the latter is a well-known visuospatial memory task. Patients with AD also performed a verbal WM test to exclude the presence of general WM impairments. Preliminary results suggest that egocentric topographical WM is selectively impaired, with respect to visuospatial and verbal WM, even without TD suggesting an important role of this memory in the early stages of AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Corsi Block-Tapping Test; environmental human navigation; topographical disorientation; working memory

PMID:
24906969
DOI:
10.1177/1533317514536597
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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