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Carbohydr Polym. 2014 Sep 22;110:505-12. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.04.052. Epub 2014 Apr 25.

Synthesis of a novel acrylated abietic acid-g-bacterial cellulose hydrogel by gamma irradiation.

Author information

1
Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz 50300, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
2
Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz 50300, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address: mciamin@pharmacy.ukm.my.
3
School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor, Malaysia.
4
Department of Pharmacy, University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY, UK.

Abstract

Acrylated abietic acid (acrylated AbA) and acrylated abietic acid-grafted bacterial cellulose pH sensitive hydrogel (acrylated AbA-g-BC) were prepared by a one-pot synthesis. The successful dimerization of acrylic acid (AA) and abietic acid (AbA) and grafting of the dimer onto bacterial cellulose (BC) was confirmed by 13C solid state NMR as well as FT-IR. X-ray diffraction analysis showed characteristic peaks for AbA and BC; further, there was no effect of increasing amorphous AA content on the overall crystallinity of the hydrogel. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a glass transition temperature of 80°C. Gel fraction and swelling studies gave insight into the features of the hydrogel, suggesting that it was suitable for future applications such as drug delivery. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed an interesting interpenetrating network within the walls of hydrogel samples with the lowest levels of AA and gamma radiation doses. Cell viability test revealed that the synthesized hydrogel is safe for future use in biomedical applications.

KEYWORDS:

Abietic acid; Bacterial cellulose; Gamma radiation; Hydrogel; Polymer

PMID:
24906785
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.04.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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