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J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):59-65. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbu062. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

Source Memory for Self and Other in Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment due to Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts. Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. nrosa@worcester.edu.
2
Center for Translational Cognitive Neuroscience, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Massachusetts. Department of Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
3
Center for Translational Cognitive Neuroscience, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Massachusetts. Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Psychology, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The present study examined the role of enactment in source memory in a cognitively impaired population. As seen in healthy older adults, it was predicted that source memory in people with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD) would benefit from the self-reference aspect of enactment.

METHOD:

Seventeen participants with MCI-AD and 18 controls worked in small groups to pack a picnic basket and suitcase and were later tested for their source memory for each item.

RESULTS:

For item memory, self-referencing improved corrected recognition scores for both MCI-AD and control participants. The MCI-AD group did not demonstrate the same benefit as controls in correct source memory for self-related items. However, those with MCI-AD were relatively less likely to misattribute new items to the self and more likely to misattribute new items to others when committing errors, compared with controls.

DISCUSSION:

The enactment effect and self-referencing did not enhance accurate source memory more than other referencing for patients with MCI-AD. However, people with MCI-AD benefited in item memory and source memory, being less likely to falsely claim new items as their own, indicating some self-reference benefit occurs for people with MCI-AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Enactment effect; Mild cognitive impairment; Self-reference; Source memory.

PMID:
24904049
PMCID:
PMC4861251
DOI:
10.1093/geronb/gbu062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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