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PLoS Genet. 2014 Jun 5;10(6):e1004397. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004397. eCollection 2014 Jun.

Palaeosymbiosis revealed by genomic fossils of Wolbachia in a strongyloidean nematode.

Author information

1
Institute of Evolutionary Biology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
2
Institute of Infection and Global Health, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
3
Institut de Recherche Agricole pour le Développement, Regional Centre of Wakwa, Ngaoundéré, Adamawa Region, Cameroon.

Abstract

Wolbachia are common endosymbionts of terrestrial arthropods, and are also found in nematodes: the animal-parasitic filaria, and the plant-parasite Radopholus similis. Lateral transfer of Wolbachia DNA to the host genome is common. We generated a draft genome sequence for the strongyloidean nematode parasite Dictyocaulus viviparus, the cattle lungworm. In the assembly, we identified nearly 1 Mb of sequence with similarity to Wolbachia. The fragments were unlikely to derive from a live Wolbachia infection: most were short, and the genes were disabled through inactivating mutations. Many fragments were co-assembled with definitively nematode-derived sequence. We found limited evidence of expression of the Wolbachia-derived genes. The D. viviparus Wolbachia genes were most similar to filarial strains and strains from the host-promiscuous clade F. We conclude that D. viviparus was infected by Wolbachia in the past, and that clade F-like symbionts may have been the source of filarial Wolbachia infections.

PMID:
24901418
PMCID:
PMC4046930
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1004397
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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